DIABETIC DIET

A diabetic diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes.

A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that’s naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone.

Why do you need to develop a healthy-eating plan?

If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy-eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control heart disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats.

When you eat extra calories and fat, your body creates an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn’t kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) that, if persistent, may lead to long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage.

You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits.

For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely.

What does a diabetes diet involve?

A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps you better use the insulin that your body produces or gets through a medication.

A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tastes and lifestyle. He or she can also talk with you about how to improve your eating habits, such as choosing portion sizes that suit the needs for your size and activity level.

Recommended foods

Make your calories count with these nutritious foods. Choose healthy carbohydrates, fiber-rich foods, fish and “good” fats.

Healthy carbohydrates

During digestion, sugars (simple carbohydrates) and starches (complex carbohydrates) break down into blood glucose. Focus on healthy carbohydrates, such as:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Whole grains
  • Legumes, such as beans and peas
  • Low-fat dairy products, such as milk and cheese

Avoid less healthy carbohydrates, such as foods or drinks with added fats, sugars and sodium.

Fiber-rich foods

Dietary fiber includes all parts of plant foods that your body can’t digest or absorb. Fiber moderates how your body digests and helps control blood sugar levels. Foods high in fiber include:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Nuts
  • Legumes, such as beans and peas
  • Whole grains

Heart-healthy fish

Eat heart-healthy fish at least twice a week. Fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna and sardines are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may prevent heart disease.

Avoid fried fish and fish with high levels of mercury, such as king mackerel.

‘Good’ fats

Foods containing monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats can help lower your cholesterol levels. These include:

  • Avocados
  • Nuts
  • Canola, olive and peanut oils

But don’t overdo it, as all fats are high in calories.

Foods to avoid

Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease and stroke by accelerating the development of clogged and hardened arteries. Foods containing the following can work against your goal of a heart-healthy diet.

  • Saturated fats. Avoid high-fat dairy products and animal proteins such as butter, beef, hot dogs, sausage and bacon. Also limit coconut and palm kernel oils.
  • Trans fats. Avoid trans fats found in processed snacks, baked goods, shortening and stick margarines.
  • Cholesterol. Cholesterol sources include high-fat dairy products and high-fat animal proteins, egg yolks, liver, and other organ meats. Aim for no more than 200 milligrams (mg) of cholesterol a day.
  • Sodium. Aim for less than 2,300 mg of sodium a day. Your doctor may suggest you aim for even less if you have high blood pressure.

Putting it all together: Creating a plan

You may use a few different approaches to create a diabetes diet to help you keep your blood glucose level within a normal range. With a dietitian’s help, you may find that one or a combination of the following methods works for you:

The plate method

The American Diabetes Association offers a simple method of meal planning. In essence, it focuses on eating more vegetables. Follow these steps when preparing your plate:

  • Fill half of your plate with nonstarchy vegetables, such as spinach, carrots and tomatoes.
  • Fill a quarter of your plate with a protein, such as tuna, lean pork or chicken.
  • Fill the last quarter with a whole-grain item, such as brown rice, or a starchy vegetable, such as green peas.
  • Include “good” fats such as nuts or avocados in small amounts.
  • Add a serving of fruit or dairy and a drink of water or unsweetened tea or coffee.

Counting carbohydrates

Because carbohydrates break down into glucose, they have the greatest impact on your blood glucose level. To help control your blood sugar, you may need to learn to calculate the amount of carbohydrates you are eating so that you can adjust the dose of insulin accordingly. It’s important to keep track of the amount of carbohydrates in each meal or snack.

A dietitian can teach you how to measure food portions and become an educated reader of food labels. He or she can also teach you how to pay special attention to serving size and carbohydrate content.

If you’re taking insulin, a dietitian can teach you how to count the amount of carbohydrates in each meal or snack and adjust your insulin dose accordingly.

Choose your foods

A dietitian may recommend you choose specific foods to help you plan meals and snacks. You can choose a number of foods from lists including categories such as carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

One serving in a category is called a “choice.” A food choice has about the same amount of carbohydrates, protein, fat and calories — and the same effect on your blood glucose — as a serving of every other food in that same category. For example, the starch, fruits and milk list includes choices that are 12 to 15 grams of carbohydrates.

Glycemic index

Some people who have diabetes use the glycemic index to select foods, especially carbohydrates. This method ranks carbohydrate-containing foods based on their effect on blood glucose levels. Talk with your dietitian about whether this method might work for you.

A sample menu

When planning meals, take into account your size and activity level. The following menu is tailored for someone who needs 1,200 to 1,600 calories a day.

  • Breakfast. Whole-wheat bread (1 medium slice) with 2 teaspoons jelly, 1/2 cup shredded wheat cereal with a cup of 1 percent low-fat milk, a piece of fruit, coffee
  • Lunch. Roast beef sandwich on wheat bread with lettuce, low-fat American cheese, tomato and mayonnaise, medium apple, water
  • Dinner. Salmon, 1 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil, small baked potato, 1/2 cup carrots, 1/2 cup green beans, medium white dinner roll, unsweetened iced tea, milk
  • Snack. 2 1/2 cups popcorn with 1 1/2 teaspoons margarine

What are the results of a diabetes diet?

Embracing your healthy-eating plan is the best way to keep your blood glucose level under control and prevent diabetes complications. And if you need to lose weight, you can tailor it to your specific goals.

Aside from managing your diabetes, a diabetes diet offers other benefits, too. Because a diabetes diet recommends generous amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, following it is likely to reduce your risk of cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancer. And consuming low-fat dairy products can reduce your risk of low bone mass in the future.

Are there any risks?

If you have diabetes, it’s important that you partner with your doctor and dietitian to create an eating plan that works for you. Use healthy foods, portion control and scheduling to manage your blood glucose level. If you stray from your prescribed diet, you run the risk of fluctuating blood sugar levels and more-serious complications.

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What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells.

Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy.

Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious.

Diabetes monitor with fruits and vegetables

What are the different types of diabetes?

The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes

If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive.

Type 2 diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes.

Gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Sometimes diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is actually type 2 diabetes.

Other types of diabetes

Less common types include monogenic diabetes, which is an inherited form of diabetes, and cystic fibrosis-related diabetes External link.

How common is diabetes?

As of 2015, 30.3 million people in the United States, or 9.4 percent of the population, had diabetes. More than 1 in 4 of them didn’t know they had the disease. Diabetes affects 1 in 4 people over the age of 65. About 90-95 percent of cases in adults are type 2 diabetes.1

Who is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes?

You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older, have a family history of diabetes, or are overweight. Physical inactivity, race, and certain health problems such as high blood pressure also affect your chance of developing type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you have prediabetes or had gestational diabetes when you were pregnant. Learn more about risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

What health problems can people with diabetes develop?

Over time, high blood glucose leads to problems such as

  • heart disease
  • stroke
  • kidney disease
  • eye problems
  • dental disease
  • nerve damage
  • foot problems

You can take steps to lower your chances of developing these diabetes-related health problems.

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Hypertension and its causes

Hypertension and its causes.

Overview

High blood pressure is a common condition in which the long-term force of the blood against your artery walls is high enough that it may eventually cause health problems, such as heart disease.

Blood pressure is determined both by the amount of blood your heart pumps and the amount of resistance to blood flow in your arteries. The more blood your heart pumps and the narrower your arteries, the higher your blood pressure.

You can have high blood pressure (hypertension) for years without any symptoms. Even without symptoms, damage to blood vessels and your heart continues and can be detected. Uncontrolled high blood pressure increases your risk of serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke.

High blood pressure generally develops over many years, and it affects nearly everyone eventually. Fortunately, high blood pressure can be easily detected. And once you know you have high blood pressure, you can work with your doctor to control it.

Causes

There are two types of high blood pressure.

Primary (essential) hypertension

For most adults, there’s no identifiable cause of high blood pressure. This type of high blood pressure, called primary (essential) hypertension, tends to develop gradually over many years.

Secondary hypertension

Some people have high blood pressure caused by an underlying condition. This type of high blood pressure, called secondary hypertension, tends to appear suddenly and cause higher blood pressure than does primary hypertension. Various conditions and medications can lead to secondary hypertension, including:

  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Kidney problems
  • Adrenal gland tumors
  • Thyroid problems
  • Certain defects you’re born with (congenital) in blood vessels
  • Certain medications, such as birth control pills, cold remedies, decongestants, over-the-counter pain relievers and some prescription drugs
  • Illegal drugs, such as cocaine and amphetamines

Risk factors

A number of factors increase the risk of hypertension.

  • Age: Hypertension is more common in people who are more than 60 years of age. Blood pressure can increase steadily with age as the arteries stiffen and narrow due to plaque buildup.
  • Ethnicity: Some ethnic groups are more prone to hypertension than others. African Americans have a higher risk than other ethnic groups, for example. · Size and weight: Being overweight or obese is a primary risk factor.
  • Alcohol and tobacco use: Regularly consuming large quantities of alcohol or tobacco can increase blood pressure.
  • Sex: According to a 2018 review, males have a higher risk of developing hypertension than females. However, this is only until after women reach menopause.
  • Existing health conditions: Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and high cholesterol levels can lead to hypertension, especially as people age.

Other risk factors include:

  • sedentary lifestyle
  • salt rich, high fat diet
  • low potassium intake

Poorly managed stress and a family history of high blood pressure can also contribute to the risk of developing hypertension.

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What is Hypertension: Symptoms, Prevention and Treatment

Hypertension, also known as high or raised blood pressure, is a condition in which the blood vessels have persistently raised pressure. Blood is carried from the heart to all parts of the body in the vessels. Each time the heart beats, it pumps blood into the vessels. Blood pressure is created by the force of blood pushing against the walls of blood vessels (arteries) as it is pumped by the heart. The higher the pressure, the harder the heart has to pump. 

Hypertension is a serious medical condition and can increase the risk of heart, brain, kidney and other diseases. It is a major cause of premature death worldwide, with upwards of 1 in 4 men and 1 in 5 women – over a billion people ­– having the condition. The burden of hypertension is felt disproportionately in low- and middle-income countries, where two thirds of cases are found, largely due to increased risk factors in those populations in recent decades. 

Symptoms

Many people with hypertension do not notice symptoms and may be unaware there is a problem. Symptoms can include early morning headaches, nosebleeds, irregular heart rhythms, vision changes, and buzzing in the ears. More severe forms may exhibit fatigue, nausea, vomiting, confusion, anxiety, chest pain, and muscle tremors. If left untreated, hypertension can cause persistent chest pain (also called angina), heart attacks, heart failure, and an irregular heartbeat, which can lead to a sudden death.  

Hypertension can also cause strokes by blocking or bursting arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the brain, as well as kidney damage, which can lead to kidney failure. High blood pressure causes damage to the heart by hardening arteries and decreasing the flood of blood and oxygen to the heart. 

Detecting hypertension is done with a quick and painless test of blood pressure. This can be done at home, but a health professional can help assess any risks or associated conditions.

Prevention and Treatment

Reducing modifiable risk factors is the best way to prevent hypertension and associated diseases of the heart, brain, kidney and other organs. These factors include unhealthy diets (excessive salt consumption, a diet high in saturated fat and trans fats, low intake of fruits and vegetables), physical inactivity, consumption of tobacco and alcohol, and being overweight or obese.  

There are also non-modifiable risk factors, including a family history of hypertension, age over 65 years and co-existing diseases such as diabetes or kidney disease. Avoiding dietary and behavioural risk factors is doubly important for those with unmodifiable or hereditary risk factors.  

Hypertension can be managed by reducing and managing mental stress, regularly checking blood pressure and consulting with health professionals, treating high blood pressure and managing other medical conditions. Cessation of tobacco use and the harmful use of alcohol, as well as improvements in diet and exercise, can help reduce symptoms and risk factors from hypertension. 

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Health Consequences of Being Underweight

What Does Underweight Really Mean?

Being underweight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) below 18.5. This is estimated to be less than the body mass needed to sustain optimal health.

Conversely, over 25 is considered overweight and over 30 is considered obese.

Use this calculatorTrusted Source to see where you fit on the BMI scale (opens in a new tab).

However, keep in mind that there are many problems with the BMI scale, which only looks at weight and height. It does not take muscle mass into account.

Some people are naturally very skinny but still healthy. Being underweight according to this scale does not necessarily mean that you have a health problem.

Being underweight is about 2–3 times more common among girls and women, compared to men. In the US, 1% of men and 2.4% of women 20 years and older are underweight (Trusted ).

Here are many natural Weight gain remedies .

What Are the Health Consequences of Being Underweight?

Obesity is currently one of the world’s biggest health problems.

However, being underweight may be just as bad for your health. According to one study, being underweight was associated with a 140% greater risk of early death in men, and 100% in women (Trusted )

In comparison, obesity was associated with a 50% greater risk of early death, indicating that being underweight may be even worse for your health.

Another study found an increased risk of early death in underweight men, but not women, suggesting that being underweight may be worse for men.

Being underweight can also impair your immune function, raise your risk of infections, lead to osteoporosis and fractures and cause fertility problems.

What’s more, people who are underweight are much more likely to get sarcopenia (age-related muscle wasting) and may be at greater risk of dementia.

Several Things Can Cause Someone to Become Underweight

There are several medical conditions that can cause unhealthy weight loss, including:

  • Eating disorders: This includes anorexia nervosa, a serious mental disorder.
  • Thyroid problems: Having an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) can boost metabolism and cause unhealthy weight loss.
  • Celiac disease: The most severe form of gluten intolerance. Most people with celiac disease don’t know that they have it (Trusted Source).
  • Diabetes: Having uncontrolled diabetes (mainly type 1) can lead to severe weight loss.
  • Cancer: Cancerous tumors often burn large amounts of calories and can cause someone to lose a lot of weight.
  • Infections: Certain infections can cause someone to become severely underweight. This includes parasites, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS.

If you’re underweight, you may want to see a doctor to rule out any serious medical conditions.

This is particularly important if you have recently started losing large amounts of weight without even trying.

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Top 15 food for weight gain

Some people are skinny and underweight, they want to gain weight. In this article I will discuss about Top 15 food for weight gain.

1. Whole Milk and milk products

Milk offers a mix of fat, carbohydrates, and proteins. It is also an excellent source of vitamins and minerals, including calcium. The protein content of milk makes it a good choice for people trying to build muscle.

One study found that after a resistance training workout, drinking skim milk helped to build muscle more effectively than a soy-based product.

A similar study involving women in resistance training showed improved results in those who drank milk following a workout.

For anyone looking to gain weight, milk can be added to the diet throughout the day.

2. Protein shakes

Protein shakes can help a person to gain weight easily and efficiently. A shake is most effective at helping to build muscle if drunk shortly after a workout.

However, it is important to note that premade shakes often contain extra sugar and other additives that should be avoided. Check labels carefully.

3. Rice

A cup of rice contains about 200 calories, and it is also a good source of carbohydrates, which contribute to weight gain. Many people find it easy to incorporate rice into meals containing proteins and vegetables.

4. Red meat

Consuming red meat has been shown to help with building muscle and gaining weight.

Steak contains both leucine and creatine, nutrients that play a significant role in boosting muscle mass. Steak and other red meats contain both protein and fat, which promote weight gain.

While a person is advised to limit their intake, leaner cuts of red meat are healthier for the heart than fattier cuts.

One study found that adding lean red meat to the diets of 100 women aged 60–90 helped them to gain weight and increase strength by 18 percent while undergoing resistance training.

5. Nuts and nut butter

Consuming nuts regularly can help a person to gain weight safely. Nuts are a great snack and can be added to many meals, including salads. Raw or dry roasted nuts have the most health benefits.

Nut butters made without added sugar or hydrogenated oils can also help. The only ingredient in these butters should be the nuts themselves.

6. Whole-grain breads

These breads contain complex carbohydrates, which can promote weight gain. Some also contain seeds, which provide added benefits.

7. Other starches

Starches help some of the foods already listed to boost muscle growth and weight gain. They add bulk to meals and boost the number of calories consumed.

Other foods rich in starches include:

  • potatoes
  • corn
  • quinoa
  • buckwheat
  • beans
  • squash
  • oats
  • legumes
  • winter root vegetables
  • sweet potatoes
  • pasta
  • whole-grain cereals
  • whole-grain breads
  • cereal bars

Beyond adding calories, starches provide energy in the form of glucose. Glucose is stored in the body as glycogen. Research indicates that glycogen can improve performance and energy during exercise.

8. Protein supplements

Athletes looking to gain weight often use protein supplements to boost muscle mass, in combination with resistance training.

9. Salmon

Six ounces of salmon will contain about 240 calories, and salmon is also rich in healthy fats, making it a good choice for those looking to gain weight.

It also contains many nutrients, including omega-3 and protein.

10. Dried fruits

Dried fruits are rich in nutrients and calories, with one-quarter cup of dried cranberries containing around 130 calories.

11. Avocados

Avocados are rich in calories and fat, as well as some vitamins and minerals.

12. Dark chocolate

Dark chocolate is a high fat, high-calorie food. It also contains antioxidants.

A person looking to gain weight should select chocolate that has a cacao content of at least 70 percent.

13. Cereal bars

Cereal bars can offer the vitamin and mineral content of cereal in a more convenient form.

A person should look for bars that contain whole grains, nuts, and fruits.

14. Eggs

Eggs are a good source of protein, healthy fat, and other nutrients. Most nutrients are contained in the yolk.

15. Cheese

Cheese is good source of fat, protein, calcium, and calories. A person looking to gain weight should select full-fat cheeses.

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Home Remedies For Weight Gain

Some people are underweight or skinny and they want to gain weight. Here are some Home Remedies For Weight Gain.

1. Dry Dates And Milk Are Good For Gaining Weight

Dry dates are categorised as rich foods. Why, you ask? Dry dates are packed with vitamins including vitamin A, C, E, K, B2, B6, niacin and thiamine, which are vital for our health and wellness. They are a good source of protein, sugar, energy and vitamins that help you gain adequate muscles without putting on much weight. Pair them with milk to accelerate the weight gain process. See visible results in about 20 to 30 days.

2. Add Clarified Butter And Sugar To Your Daily Diet

Take one tablespoon of clarified butter and mix it well with one tablespoon of sugar. Eat this mixture every day at least half an hour before your lunch or dinner on an empty stomach. Consuming this concoction for one month will give you the desired results.

3. Pair Mango and Milk Together

Eat one ripe mango three times a day and pair it with a glass of warm milk after eating the mango. Mango comprises adequate amounts of carbohydrate, sugar and proteins, which help increase your body mass. You will see noticeable results after a month.

4. Afternoon Nap Is As Important As A Good Night’s Sleep

Yes, you read that right! Sleeping in afternoon for about 45 minutes to an hour relaxes your mind and muscles. This not only helps you gain weight, but also help you to have a sound sleep at night. This is one of the fastest ways to gain weight without hitting the gym.

5. Add Peanut Butter To Your Daily Breakfast

Peanuts are power-packed with fatty acids, proteins, minerals and vitamins. Adding a few peanuts to your daily diet helps in gaining weight. Similarly, peanut butter is known to have high calories, which makes it a perfect home remedy to gain weight. Apply peanut butter on your multigrain bread and see the results in 30 days!

6. Replace Morning/Evening Tea With Banana Shake

Bananas are full of calories and give us an instant energy lift. This is why mostly all the sports players eat a banana between their games. But in order to gain weight, pair your banana with a glass of milk; better still, prepare banana shake and replace it with your morning/evening tea or coffee.

7. Don’t Boil Potatoes, Bake Them

Packed with carbohydrates, adding potatoes to your diet will help increase your body weight. The best way to eat them is to grill or bake them with butter. But, there is no harm in eating French fries once a while. Make sure you air-fry them using extra virgin oil.

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Diet for Diverticulitis or Diverticulosis

Definition

A diverticulitis diet is something your doctor might recommend as part of a short-term treatment plan for acute diverticulitis. In this article briefly explain the topic, “Diet for Diverticulitis or Diverticulosis”.

Diverticula are small, bulging pouches that can form in the lining of the digestive system. They’re found most often in the lower part of the large intestine (colon). This condition is called diverticulosis.

In some cases, one or more of the pouches become inflamed or infected. This is known as diverticulitis.

Mild cases of diverticulitis are usually treated with antibiotics and a low-fiber diet, or treatment may start with a period of rest where you eat nothing by mouth, then start with clear liquids and then move to a low-fiber diet until your condition improves. More-severe cases typically require hospitalization.

Purpose

Nutrition therapy for diverticulitis is a temporary measure to give your digestive system a chance to rest. Eat small amounts until bleeding and diarrhea subside.

Diet details

Your diet starts with only clear liquids for a few days. Examples of items allowed on a clear liquid diet include:

  • Broth
  • Fruit juices without pulp, such as apple juice
  • Ice chips
  • Ice pops without bits of fruit or fruit pulp
  • Gelatin
  • Water
  • Tea or coffee without cream

As you start feeling better, your doctor will recommend that you slowly add low-fiber foods. Examples of low-fiber foods include:

  • Canned or cooked fruits without skin or seeds
  • Canned or cooked vegetables such as green beans, carrots and potatoes (without the skin)
  • Eggs, fish and poultry
  • Refined white bread
  • Fruit and vegetable juice with no pulp
  • Low-fiber cereals
  • Milk, yogurt and cheese
  • White rice, pasta and noodles

Results

You should feel better within two or three days of starting the diet and antibiotics. If you haven’t started feeling better by then, call your doctor. Also contact your doctor if:

  • You develop a fever
  • Your abdominal pain is worsening
  • You’re unable to keep clear liquids down

These may indicate a complication that requires hospitalization.

Risks

Nutrition therapy for diverticulitis has few risks. However, continuing a clear liquid diet for more than a few days can lead to weakness and other complications, since it doesn’t provide enough of the nutrients your body needs. For this reason, your doctor will want you to transition back to a normal diet that includes foods with fiber as soon as you can tolerate it.

If you want to know about immunity boosting foods click here

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How to Gain Weight? The Right Way

This is a concern, as being underweight can be just as bad for your health as being obese. Additionally, many people who are not clinically underweight still want to gain some muscle. Whether you’re clinically underweight or simply struggling to gain muscle weight, the main principles are the same. This article explains about How to Gain Weight? The Right Way

What Does Underweight Really Mean?

Being underweight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) below 18.5. This is estimated to be less than the body mass needed to sustain optimal health. Conversely, over 25 is considered overweight and over 30 is considered obese.

Use this calculator to see where you fit on the BMI scale (opens in a new tab).

However, keep in mind that there are many problems with the BMI scale, which only looks at weight and height. It does not take muscle mass into account.

Some people are naturally very skinny but still healthy. Being underweight according to this scale does not necessarily mean that you have a health problem.

Being underweight is about 2–3 times more common among girls and women, compared to men. In the US, 1% of men and 2.4% of women 20 years and older are underweight (Trusted Source).

What Are the Health Consequences of Being Underweight?

Obesity is currently one of the world’s biggest health problems. However, being underweight may be just as bad for your health. According to one study, being underweight was associated with a 140% greater risk of early death in men, and 100% in women (Trusted Source).

In comparison, obesity was associated with a 50% greater risk of early death, indicating that being underweight may be even worse for your health (Trusted Source).

Another study found an increased risk of early death in underweight men, but not women, suggesting that being underweight may be worse for men (Trusted Source).

Being underweight can also impair your immune function, raise your risk of infections, lead to osteoporosis and fractures and cause fertility problems (Trusted SourceTrusted SourceTrusted Source).

What’s more, people who are underweight are much more likely to get sarcopenia (age-related muscle wasting) and may be at greater risk of dementia (Trusted SourceTrusted Source).

Several Things Can Cause Someone to Become Underweight

There are several medical conditions that can cause unhealthy weight loss, including:

  • Eating disorders: This includes anorexia nervosa, a serious mental disorder.
  • Thyroid problems: Having an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) can boost metabolism and cause unhealthy weight loss.
  • Celiac disease: The most severe form of gluten intolerance. Most people with celiac disease don’t know that they have it (Trusted Source).
  • Diabetes: Having uncontrolled diabetes (mainly type 1) can lead to severe weight loss.
  • Cancer: Cancerous tumors often burn large amounts of calories and can cause someone to lose a lot of weight.
  • Infections: Certain infections can cause someone to become severely underweight. This includes parasites, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS.

If you’re underweight, you may want to see a doctor to rule out any serious medical conditions.

This is particularly important if you have recently started losing large amounts of weight without even trying.

How to Gain Weight the Healthy Way

If you want to gain weight, it’s very important to do it right.

Binging on soda and donuts may help you gain weight, but it can destroy your health at the same time.

If you’re underweight, you want to gain a balanced amount of muscle mass and subcutaneous fat rather than a lot of unhealthy belly fat.

There are plenty of normal-weight people who get type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other health problems often associated with obesity (Trusted Source).

Therefore, it’s absolutely essential to eat healthy foods and live an overall healthy lifestyle.

Eat More Calories Than Your Body Burns

The most important thing you can do to gain weight is to create a calorie surplus, meaning you eat more calories than your body needs.

If you want to gain weight slowly and steadily, aim for 300–500 calories more than you burn each day according to the calculator.

If you want to gain weight fast, aim for around 700–1,000 calories above your maintenance level.

Keep in mind that calorie calculators only provide estimates. Your needs may vary by several hundred calories per day, give or take.

You don’t need to count calories for the rest of your life, but it helps to do it for the first few days or weeks to get a feel for how many calories you’re eating. There are many great tools out there to help you.

Eat Plenty of Protein

The single most important nutrient for gaining healthy weight is protein.

Muscle is made of protein and without it most of those extra calories may end up as body fat.

Studies show that during periods of overfeeding, a high-protein diet causes many of the extra calories to be turned into muscle (Trusted Source).

However, keep in mind that protein is a double-edged sword. It’s also highly filling, which may reduce your hunger and appetite significantly, making it harder to get in enough calories (Trusted SourceTrusted Source).

If you’re trying to gain weight, aim for 0.7–1 grams of protein per pound of body weight (1.5–2.2 grams of protein per kilogram). You can even go above that if your calorie intake is very high.

High-protein foods include meats, fish, eggs, many dairy products, legumes, nuts and others. Protein supplements like whey protein can also be useful if you struggle to get enough protein in your diet.

Fill up on Plenty of Carbs and Fat and Eat at Least 3 Times per Day

Many people try restricting either carbs or fat when trying to lose weight.

This is a bad idea if your goal is to gain weight, as it will make it harder to get in enough calories.

Eat plenty of high-carb and high-fat foods if weight gain is a priority for you. It is best to eat plenty of protein, fat and carbs at each meal.

It is also a bad idea to do intermittent fasting. This is useful for weight loss and health improvement but can make it much harder to eat enough calories to gain weight.

Make sure to eat at least three meals per day and try to add in energy-dense snacks whenever possible.

Eat Energy-Dense Foods and Use Sauces, Spices and Condiments

Again, it’s very important to eat mostly whole, single-ingredient foods.

The problem is that these foods tend to be more filling than processed junk foods, making it harder to get in enough calories.

Using plenty of spices, sauces and condiments can help with this. The tastier your food is, the easier it is to eat a lot of it.

Also, try to emphasize energy-dense foods as much as possible. These are foods that contain many calories relative to their weight.

Here are some energy-dense foods that are perfect for gaining weight:

  • Nuts: Almonds, walnuts, macadamia nuts, peanuts, etc.
  • Dried fruit: Raisins, dates, prunes and others.
  • High-fat dairy: Whole milk, full-fat yogurt, cheese, cream.
  • Fats and oils: Extra virgin olive oil and avocado oil.
  • Grains: Whole grains like oats and brown rice.
  • Meat: Chicken, beef, pork, lamb, etc. Choose fattier cuts.
  • Tubers: Potatoes, sweet potatoes and yams.
  • Dark chocolate, avocados, peanut butter, coconut milk, granola, trail mixes.

Many of these foods are very filling, and sometimes you may need to force yourself to keep eating even if you feel full.

It may be a good idea to avoid eating a ton of vegetables if gaining weight is a priority for you. It simply leaves less room for energy-dense foods.

Eating whole fruit is fine, but try to emphasize fruit that doesn’t require too much chewing, such as bananas.

If you need more suggestions, consider reading this article on 18 healthy foods to gain weight fast.

Lift Heavy Weights and Improve Your Strength

To make sure that the excess calories go to your muscles instead of just your fat cells, it’s absolutely crucial to lift weights.

Go to a gym and lift 2–4 times per week. Lift heavy and try to increase the weights and volume over time.

If you’re completely out of shape or new to training, consider hiring a qualified personal trainer to help you get started.

You may also want to consult with a doctor if you have skeletal problems or any medical issue.

It’s probably best to take it easy on the cardio for now — focus mostly on the weights.

Doing some cardio is fine to improve fitness and well-being, but don’t do so much that you end up burning all the additional calories you’re eating.

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Does Metabolism Matter in Weight Loss?

What Is Metabolism?

Metabolism or metabolic rate is defined as the series of chemical reactions in a living organism that create and break down energy necessary for life. More simply, it’s the rate at which your body expends energy or burns calories. In this article I will discuss about Does Metabolism Matter in Weight Loss?

Our bodies burn calories in several ways:

  • Through the energy required to keep the body functioning at rest; this is known as your basal metabolic rate (BMR). Your BMR is partly determined by the genes you inherit.
  • Through everyday activities
  • Through exercise

Does Metabolism Matter in Weight Loss?

Metabolism is partly genetic and largely outside of one’s control. Changing it is a matter of considerable debate. Some people are just lucky. They inherited genes that promote a faster metabolism and can eat more than others without gaining weight. Others are not so lucky and end up with a slow metabolism.

One way to think about metabolism is to view your body as a car engine that is always running. When you’re sitting still or sleeping, you’re engine is idling like a car at a stop light. A certain amount of energy is being burned just to keep the engine running. Of course, for humans, the fuel source is not gasoline. It’s the calories found in foods we eat and beverages we drink — energy that may be used right away or stored (especially in the form of fat) for use later.

How fast your body’s “engine” runs on average, over time, determines how many calories you burn. If your metabolism is “high” (or fast), you will burn more calories at rest and during activity. A high metabolism means you’ll need to take in more calories to maintain your weight. That’s one reason why some people can eat more than others without gaining weight. A person with a “low” (or slow) metabolism will burn fewer calories at rest and during activity and therefore has to eat less to avoid becoming overweight.

It’s part truth and part myth that metabolism is the key to weight. The rising tide of obesity in this country cannot be blamed entirely on an inherited tendency to have a slow metabolism. Genes do not change that quickly. Something environmental — particularly, changes in diet and exercising too little — are much more likely culprits.

The reality is that for most people, excess weight is not all due to bad luck, thyroid trouble or some other unexplained, uncontrollable external factor. It’s simple accounting involving calories in and calories out that determines changes in weight over a lifetime.

Regardless of whether your metabolism is fast or slow, our bodies are designed to store excess energy in fat cells. So if you eat and drink more calories (energy “intake”) than your body expends (energy “output”) you will gain weight. On the other hand, if you eat and drink fewer calories than are burned through everyday activities (including exercise, rest and sleep), you’ll lose weight. Our bodies are also programmed to sense a lack of food as starvation. In response, our BMR slows down, which means fewer calories burned over time. That’s one reason why losing weight is often difficult.

Perhaps the most remarkable thing about all of this is how little our weight tends to change from day to day. In fact, only a few excess calories each day could lead to significant weight gain at the end of a year. For example, eating an extra apple each day would lead to a weight gain of nearly 9 pounds by the end of one year! Similarly, even a small reduction in calories each day could lead to remarkable weight loss. Eliminating dessert one day a week would lead to weight loss of nearly 6 pounds in a year.

Many theories exist to explain what controls the amount of food a person eats, when they feel full and why they eat past the point of feeling full. These factors also play a role in determining one’s ultimate weight. One theory is that each of us has a set point — a weight at which the body is “happy.” If you lose weight, you’ll feel hungry until you get back to your set point weight. That may be another reason it is so hard to lose excess weight. But how that set point is determined and whether there truly is such a mechanism remain uncertain.

The Bottom Line

When it comes to weight, metabolism is important and does have a genetic component. Whether you can change your metabolic rate, however, is a matter of considerable debate. Clearly, you can change how you balance the calories you take in against the calories you burn up through activity, which can change your weight.

What can I do to boost up my metabolism?

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