Top 12 Vitamin C rich foods

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that’s found in many foods, particularly fruits and vegetables. Top 12 Vitamin C rich foods are mentioned below.

1. Guava

Yellow and red fruits are usually credited with having high vitamin content, but guava is a fruit that stands tall as an exception. A single guava fruit, weighing 100 grams, has over 200mg of Vitamin C content (as per the USDA), which is almost twice as high as that in an orange.

2. Pineapple

Pineapple is an underrated nutrient powerhouse – the fruit contains huge amounts of vitamin C. A mineral which is rarely found in natural foods, manganese, is also found in pineapple making it a great addition to the diet.

3. Strawberries

Strawberries are known for their antioxidant properties all over, but they are also a rich source of vitamin C. Their vitamin C content is slightly more than that in a single orange.

4. Kiwi

If you’re looking for a healthy snack option or a way to add ‘green’ to your diet, Kiwi fruit is the way to go. Just one kiwi fruit contains up to 84mg of vitamin C, along with other vital vitamins such as vitamin K and E.

5. Mango

Mangoes are naturally high in vitamin C and beta-carotene, and thus help in boosting immunity as well. Green mangoes actually have more vitamin C content than their yellow or red counterparts.

6. Papaya

Papaya is best enjoyed fresh, whether as a salad or in the form of a juice. Half a papaya, if eaten raw, provides a significantly higher amount of Vitamin C than a single orange.

7. Broccoli

Apart from being a great vegetable for maintaining overall health, broccoli is also a great naturally occurring source of vitamin C, which helps repair damaged tissue and maintaining a healthy immunity.

8. Kale

Kale has a number of health benefits, and one of them is being high in vitamins C and K. A delicious kale juice is the way to add it to your diet or can even be replaced in pesto sauce, in place of basil.

9. Red And Yellow Bell Peppers

Red and yellow bell peppers are super rich in antioxidants, which help in maintaining eye and heart health. They also contain high amounts of vitamin C, which boosts collagen level and may help to prevent lung cancer too.

So, next time you’re looking for ways to add to your diet that are naturally high in vitamin C, try one of these options instead of using the regular orange.

10. Oranges

One medium-sized orange provides 70 mg of vitamin C, which is 78% of the DV.

Widely eaten, oranges make up a significant portion of dietary vitamin C intake.

Other citrus fruits can also help you meet your vitamin C needs. For example, half a grapefruit contains 44 mg or 73% of the DV, a mandarin 24 mg or 39% of the DV and the juice of one lime 13 mg or 22% of the DV.

11. Lemons

Lemons were given to sailors during the 1700s to prevent scurvy. One whole raw lemon, including its peel, provides 83 mg of vitamin C, or 92% of the DV.

The vitamin C in lemon juice also acts as an antioxidant.

When fruits and vegetables are cut, the enzyme polyphenol oxidase is exposed to oxygen. This triggers oxidation and turns the food brown. Applying lemon juice to the exposed surfaces acts as a barrier, preventing the browning process.

12. Parsley

Two tablespoons (8 grams) of fresh parsley contain 10 mg of vitamin C, providing 11% of the recommended DV.

Along with other leafy greens, parsley is a significant source of plant-based, non-heme iron.

Vitamin C increases the absorption of non-heme iron. This helps prevent and treat iron-deficiency anemia (27Trusted Source28Trusted Source).

One two-month study gave people on a vegetarian diet 500 mg of vitamin C twice a day with their meals. At the end of the study, their iron levels had increased by 17%, hemoglobin by 8% and ferritin, which is the stored form of iron, by 12% (29Trusted Source).

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Vitamin C Functions and Food Sources

Vitamin C Functions and Food Sources

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin. It is needed for normal growth and development. Here are some functions and food sources of vitamin C.

Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water. Leftover amounts of the vitamin leave the body through the urine. Although the body keeps a small reserve of these vitamins, they have to be taken regularly to prevent a shortage in the body.

Function

Vitamin C is needed for the growth and repair of tissues in all parts of your body. It is used to:

  • Form an important protein used to make skin, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels
  • Heal wounds and form scar tissue
  • Repair and maintain cartilage, bones, and teeth
  • Aid in the absorption of iron

Vitamin C is one of many antioxidants. Antioxidants are nutrients that block some of the damage caused by free radicals.

  • Free radicals are made when your body breaks down food or when you are exposed to tobacco smoke or radiation.
  • The buildup of free radicals over time is largely responsible for the aging process.
  • Free radicals may play a role in cancer, heart disease, and conditions like arthritis.

The body is not able to make vitamin C on its own. It does not store vitamin C. It is therefore important to include plenty of vitamin C-containing foods in your daily diet.

For many years, vitamin C has been a popular household remedy for the common cold.

  • Research shows that for most people, vitamin C supplements or vitamin C-rich foods do not reduce the risk of getting the common cold.
  • However, people who take vitamin C supplements regularly might have slightly shorter colds or somewhat milder symptoms.
  • Taking a vitamin C supplement after a cold starts does not appear to be helpful.

Food Sources

All fruits and vegetables contain some amount of vitamin C.

Fruits with the highest sources of vitamin C include:

  • Cantaloupe
  • Citrus fruits and juices, such as orange and grapefruit
  • Kiwi fruit
  • Mango
  • Papaya
  • Pineapple
  • Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, and cranberries
  • Watermelon

Vegetables with the highest sources of vitamin C include:

  • Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cauliflower
  • Green and red peppers
  • Spinach, cabbage, turnip greens, and other leafy greens
  • Sweet and white potatoes
  • Tomatoes and tomato juice
  • Winter squash

Some cereals and other foods and beverages are fortified with vitamin C. Fortified means a vitamin or mineral has been added to the food. Check the product labels to see how much vitamin C is in the product.

Cooking vitamin C-rich foods or storing them for a long period of time can reduce the vitamin C content. Microwaving and steaming vitamin C-rich foods may reduce cooking losses. The best food sources of vitamin C are uncooked or raw fruits and vegetables. Exposure to light can also reduce vitamin C content. Choose orange juice that is sold in a carton instead of a clear bottle.

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